Fossil Giant Sequoia Foliage

Here is the youngest fossil foliage from a Giant Sequoia (Sequoiadendron chaneyi Axelrod) yet discovered in the geologic record--it came from an unnamed rock formation roughly 4.8 to 5.1 million years old (early Pliocene in geologic age) near Minden-Gardnerville in Douglas County, western Nevada. During the Miocene, Giant Sequoia was rather widespread throughout the ancestral Great Basin region of Nevada, occurring at a number of famous Middle Miocene (roughly 16 to 11 million years old) fossil plant localities, such as Middlegate, Purple Mountain , Aldrich Hill, Chalk Hills and Fallon. Today, Giant Sequoia is restricted to a narrow, moist belt along the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada in California; it tends to occur in rather isolated pockets, called groves, where environmental conditions favor its persistence--most notably at Sequoia National Park east of Fresno. The specimen shown here (part and counterpart of the same specimen on two different pieces of shale; in actual size, the pieces of shale shown in the images are roughly 10 centimeters, or 4 inches across) is the youngest foliage known from Big Tree in the fossil record (pollens from Sierra Redwood have been identified from younger sedimentary formations, such as the Coso Formation in Inyo County, California, at roughly 3 million years old). Also present on the matrix is a fossil leaf from a new species of evergreen live oak--identified by paleobotanist Howard Schorn--that is very closely related to the huckleberry oak, Quercus vaccinofolia, a variety now native to the Sierra Nevada and Cascade ranges of California and to the Siskiyou and North Coast Ranges of northern California and southern Oregon. The fossils reside on a slab of diatomaceous mudstone collected in early July 2001 by Dr. Diane Erwin--Collections Manager of fossil plants at the University California Museum of Paleontology (in Berkeley, California) from an isolated outcrop in the Pine Nut Mountains of Douglas County, Nevada. The specimens are now under formal paleobotanical study by Dr. Erwin and Howard Schorn (retired Collections Manager of Fossils Plants at UCMP). The first specimens of fossil giant sequoia foliage from this particular locality were collected by Howard Schorn in the 1990s.

In addition to my many Web pages pertaining to matters paleontological and geological, I also have 5 sites up and running that feature my solo, acoustic, instrumental 6 and 12-string guitar playing--in addition to songs I have recorded with my parents over the years (family music) And it's all free music--for listening and for downloads of the mp3 files.

Jump on over to The Acoustic Guitar Solitaire Of Inyo--A Cyber-CD for 30 covers of some of my favorite songs--all played on a 1976 Martin D-35 6-string guitar.

For 32 mp3 selections of original compositions and covers of some of my favorite songs--all played on a 1970 Stella 12-string guitar, a 1976 Martin D-35 guitar and a Sigma DMISTCE guitar, head on over to Beyond The Timberline--A Cyber-CD .

At The Distant Path--A Cyber CD listen to me play 32 covers and original compositions on a 1976 Martin D-35, a Sigma DMISTCE 6-string guitar and a 1970 Stella 12-string guitar.

Over at Inyo And Folks--A Musical History I've created a page that features 35 songs I recorded with my parents--all played on acoustic 6 and 12-string guitars, banjo, kazoo and tambourine.

Go to Acoustic Stratigraphy: I play 34 covers of some of my favorite songs on acoustic 6 and 12-string guitars.

Back To Badwater--A Cyber-CD: Listen to me play 32 covers and original compositions on 6 and 12-string guitars; it's all free music.

For an all-text page that includes all 227 of my guitar mp3 files placed on the Internet, go to All Inyo All The Time. That's where you'll find access to all of my musical selections, in order of their appearance on the Web--from my first Cyber-CD ("The Acoustic Guitar Solitaire Of Inyo") to the last, "Inyo 7" (never placed on the Net as a stand-alone Cyber-CD).

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